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 Post subject: Home Education
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 8:21 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 538
Hello

I just wondered - is it permissible to home educate / de-school children in Portugal?

Or is a formal school education mandatory?

I am asking on behalf of a friend.

Thank you.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 8:35 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:17 am
Posts: 2847
Location: Tabua, Central Portugal
http://www.expatsportugal.com/phpBB2/vi ... php?t=2493


http://www.expatsportugal.com/phpBB2/vi ... php?t=5264


These are from a thread I started or posted on a while back.

I KNOW there are people doing home education in Portugal but MAINLY these are “below the horizon” families.


As always in Portugal things change so ask a lot of people and get a range of views even ask the school.

.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 9:49 am 
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Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 538
Hello Shelby

Thank you for those links . . . but it does look as though it will be best if they speak to the local education authority / school and take it from there.

For myself, I do have friends who have home-schooled in the UK, not very well in my opinion, despite both parents being qualified teachers.

I do feel, and it's easy for me because I don't have to make the choice, that if I had young children, the 'best' thing to do is to encourage and support them to attend the local school . . . not only for companionship and developing social skills, but also for the great opportunity to become fluent in another language . . . which I think is probably easier the younger you start.

Thanks again for the info. Interestingly, being an immigrant to Portugal has given me such an insight into the challenges for immigrants into the UK . . . other peoples' shoes and all that :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 12:56 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 8:56 pm
Posts: 334
I am sure if you are not a pt resident, you can home-school, as you fall under UK rules.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:08 am 
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Joined: Fri Jun 08, 2007 8:35 pm
Posts: 752
Location: Castelo Branco
We have brit friends who had a son start school that later withdrew him, to go back to home schooling.

He was only there I think for 2-3 weeks, but long enough to definately be on the local authority radar. Its dangerous to make to too many assumptions from that.

I share your concerns too Robin about home schooling. I have not been impressed by what I have seen.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2012 9:37 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2012 11:23 am
Posts: 10
Donkey boy wrote:
I share your concerns too Robin about home schooling. I have not been impressed by what I have seen.


Funny that - I'm often unimpressed by what I have seen of schooled children.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 4:10 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 27, 2005 4:53 pm
Posts: 1016
Location: Near a leak...
Without the fundamental bilingualism from lessons and playground I'd say the key benefit of parachuting kids into a new country and culture would be lost, a sad thing. Plus no school network of friends for later life.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 8:44 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 17, 2008 8:09 am
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GPF wrote:
Without the fundamental bilingualism from lessons and playground I'd say the key benefit of parachuting kids into a new country and culture would be lost, a sad thing. Plus no school network of friends for later life.


True.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2012 2:36 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2008 3:17 pm
Posts: 71
Location: FZZ
With 3 children all in school since 2008 the eldest taking the Provas to graduate ciclo one. They have been in school in the interior initially a village school with 20 odd children....education was limited but language learning and integrating much much easier.

Now we moved areas and they go to a bigger school 600 pupils with great teachers and they are thriving. They are happy, busy socially and integrated. A lot more so than me.

And they are bilingual, they mostly havent lost their english ness but they also have enough portuguesish ness to fit in without any more than the usual problems any child faces at any school.

I find the interest from my childrens Portuguese teachers reassuring. They have assessed each of my childrens characters and always have some recommendations. Whereas in England my children were often ignored as they didnt cause any trouble.

So far the experience of local education has been only positive.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 10:27 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:03 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Netherlands
Hello,
Homeschooling is legal in Portugal. Claudia Sousa tells more about it in this video;
http://youtu.be/aa9BkryYIuw

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